Knowing God – Interview with Jemma Brown — YouBelong

What is your name and what does it mean? My name is Jemma Brown and it means precious gem which is very fitting as I was a long awaited baby! It took my parents 10 years to conceive me hence I’m my parents precious gem. Do you think your name suits who you are and/ […]

Knowing God – Interview with Jemma Brown — YouBelong

I had the privilege a few weeks ago of compleating this short interview for YouBelong so I thought I would share it.

Since discovering YouBelong on Twitter I have been following there work and I am so encouraged by what they are doing. I have also enjoyed reading the other interviews in the series so would reccomend checking them out.

The Mission of YouBelong is:

“Community Support Empower

We aim to give chronically ill and disabled christians:

an online support network of people who can also have a chronic illness or disability and share the struggles that come from living as a christian whilst facing the questions and problems that arise from chronic illness/disability.

platforms to discuss disability and chronic illness theology via our blog posts and social media pages

a church who love, support and empower them”

youbelong.org.uk

I would really encourage those leading Churches or working in minestry or theology to take a look at the website. Put simply there are lots of small steps Churches can take to make things easier and more accessible for those with chronic illness, mental health conditions and disability. In most cases such small changes often turn out to benefit everyone.

Christian Accessibility #Twitter

I’ve been reading a lot about the theology of disability and mental health of late and discussing some of what I have learned in some really interesting discussions on Twitter.

Yes – social media gets a lot of criticism particularly Twitter but it definitely has its positives, I have found community and I love it.

Following a discussion today it made me realise thee is no one place to find out about disability theology, inclusion, trainers or organisations working in the field.

I decided to do something about this in a small way using Twitter. I have created a public Twitter list containing people who work in the field and also organisations ministering to those with disability.

Its worth noting I am choosing to use the word disability for purely practical reasons, Twitter has a character limit on both list names and there accompanying descriptions. Although I am using the term disability I am including chronic illness and mental health in the list.

The aim of this list is to pool information to enable people looking to find resources be that an organisation for support or a expert to consult on accessibility or talk at your event.

The name of the list is Christian accessibility and you can find it here.

Obviously this is a work in progress and there are not many resources on the list currently if you have a suggestion for the list please drop me a tweet @JemmaBrown obviously your recommendation has to be on Twitter.

#IOS #Accessibility How I use an Apple Watch

So the hashtag #BlindPeopleUsePhones went viral a while back after a meme surfaced showing a person with a white cane using a phone… the narrow minded thought was that if someone could use a phone then they MUST be faking there visual impairment.

Since that happened many many visually impaired people have flooded social media with images and captions of them using there phone.

Also since this happened despite efforts for organisations like RNIB I have heard people say:

Look she’s using her phone

I also had one occasion where a random stranger thought it would be ok to take pictures of me using my phone on the bus… in case your wondering that is NEVER ok!

So how do I use my phone… it’s ok to be confused by the title and the link referring to the Apple Watch I’m lumping the two devices together because how I use them is very similar.

Saying that I’m going to separate the Apple Watch for just one minute.

With the Apple Watch I have purchased the largest size, I need that extra few millimetres to make things as large as possible on screen. I then have the system font set to the largest size possible. The final thing that is ‘different’ is I use the XL digital watch face – meaning I have no complications and this is set to a pale colour to maximise contrast.

Now let’s talk about iOS devices as a whole.

I use a combination of VoiceOver, Zoom, large fonts and Siri to access my phone watch and my ancient Mac at home.

Sounds like a lot… kinda complicated? Well it kinda is!

My vision can change from hour to hour very dramatically… not in a good way.

So I may start my day using just larger fonts and the screen brightness all the way up.

I end my day needing to use voiceover unable to use the screen at all.

As an aside I use Siri voice assistant with voice feedback a lot!

I also have my phone set up to read the screen on command.

For more information on Apples accessibility for visually impaired check out this link.

So yes blind people can use phones, computers, (talking) cash machines and smart watches.

apple.news/AbswLIkqJQSG2x67z6bPiAA

Upgraded: The Gaming Accessibility Conference 2018

Gaming accessibility is something I’m really passionate about because I have grown up gaming and with a visual impairment.

A lot is being done it has to be said mostly by Microsoft (the Xbox one has a screen reader, Magnification and a plethora of controller set up options) it seems the whole gaming community is getting together to spread the word on accessible gaming.

I would have loved to have been at this conference able to get my voice heard.

I have a Nintendo Switch and I love it dearly but it lacks even basic accessibility settings when you compare it with the big boys of PlayStation and Xbox (however there is give and take on both sides)… purely based on accessibility I would love to own an Xbox as well as my Switch.

NEWSFLASH! People with all kinds of disabilities play console/computer games of all kinds. We are as diverse as any other group it’s time for industry to hear our voice.

Please see below for original post

Upgraded: The Gaming Accessibility Conference 2018

https://uncannyvivek.wordpress.com/2018/11/27/gaconf2018/
— Read on uncannyvivek.wordpress.com/2018/11/27/gaconf2018/

Spyro The Dragon Remake Excludes Deaf Gamers

Ok I’m going to wade in and out this point across on the flip side.

There are many games that ONLY have subtitles and no narration this thus excludes blind gamers.

There is no one size fits all to make gaming accessible to everyone.

I’m currently playing Let’s Go Pokémon and for me given it’s a RPG driven by text I’m really genuinely surprised there is not the option to change the text size or text contrast.

I think what we need to take away from this is that game developers need to do more and think more about the accessibility of the content they are creating.

Spyro The Dragon Remake Excludes Deaf Gamers

Spyro The Dragon Remake Excludes Deaf Gamers
— Read on samedifference1.com/2018/11/20/spyro-the-dragon-remake-excludes-deaf-gamers/

#BADD Blogging Against Disabilism Day

  BADD falls on Friday 1st of May this year and I was shocked to read it’s 10 years… I remember the early days and have taken part most years.

So why am I telling you this?

BADD is open to anyone to contribute an you can use any medium you like to blog and you can blog about anything that affects disabled people AND perhaps most importantly you don’t have to have a disability to take part. 

To quote The Goldfish who does a fantastic job of organising:

 This is the day where all around the world, disabled and non-disabled people blog about their experiences, observations and thoughts about disability discrimination (known as disablism or ableism). In this way, we hope to raise awareness of inequality, promote equality and celebrate the progress we’ve made.

So I urge all my followers who blog to get stuck in and take part. Instructions for doing so can be found at this link… It’s easy I promise! 

http://blobolobolob.blogspot.co.uk/2015/04/blogging-against-disablism-day-2015.html?m=1

Bid to kill #CAPTCHA security test gains momentum

Bid to kill CAPTCHA security test gains momentum

This is great since CAPTCHA’s started popping up blind and visually impaired people have faced huge issues accessing anything online that needs a CAPTCHA. This has lead to people having to ask sighted people for help sometimes having to give out there log in details and other secure information.

Since they were initially launched there have been access improvements – many now have scrambled audio where numbers are spoken alongside what I can only describe as noise. Unfortunately this has not gone far enough the audio versions don’t work on mobile platforms and are often just as unintelligible as there written alternatives.

From the early days of the CAPTCHA there have been viable alternatives and quite frankly it’s about time code writers and designers start using them.

#DWP & #ATOS at it again please read! – #disability #ESA & #ATOS

I just read an article that has hugely saddened me, please keep reading and follow the link to get the full story.

A blind woman has been made seriously physically ill by ATOS and the DWP working in a way that totally disregards the Equality Act.

Having just read the facts of what happened I am so stunned that I really don’t know what to say.

The matter boils down to one of what’s sometimes called a print disability. The term print disability can be used to describe anyone who is unable or would struggle to read standard print. It’s an umbrella term and can be used to describe conditions such as total blindness, dyslexia and intellectual disabilities.

In this case the lady in question uses Braille or audio instead of standard print and ATOS & DWP are unable to produce this.

They then told her that she would have to find someone to fill out the form for her.

The stress of this landed her in hospital.

As I said at the beginning this saddens me you might think that’s a strange reaction, maybe it is but for me it’s personal.

As I’ve mentioned before my mum is almost totally blind her way of dealing with written correspondence is Braille.

My mum requested the same form as the woman in this story in Braille and got the response at the other end of the phone that said ‘I’m not sure if we do Braille but we should I will try and get it for you’.

The form the arrived in standard print with a deadline to have it completed and the threat that missing that deadline will result in loss of benefits.

My mum is lucky she got help from my dad and a local charity but for thousands of other people this is not the case.

I have also had help to fill out the form in question. I’ve also had the stress of trying to get it done in time for the deadline bearing in mind I get one hour of support a week!