#IOS #Accessibility How I use an Apple Watch

So the hashtag #BlindPeopleUsePhones went viral a while back after a meme surfaced showing a person with a white cane using a phone… the narrow minded thought was that if someone could use a phone then they MUST be faking there visual impairment.

Since that happened many many visually impaired people have flooded social media with images and captions of them using there phone.

Also since this happened despite efforts for organisations like RNIB I have heard people say:

Look she’s using her phone

I also had one occasion where a random stranger thought it would be ok to take pictures of me using my phone on the bus… in case your wondering that is NEVER ok!

So how do I use my phone… it’s ok to be confused by the title and the link referring to the Apple Watch I’m lumping the two devices together because how I use them is very similar.

Saying that I’m going to separate the Apple Watch for just one minute.

With the Apple Watch I have purchased the largest size, I need that extra few millimetres to make things as large as possible on screen. I then have the system font set to the largest size possible. The final thing that is ‘different’ is I use the XL digital watch face – meaning I have no complications and this is set to a pale colour to maximise contrast.

Now let’s talk about iOS devices as a whole.

I use a combination of VoiceOver, Zoom, large fonts and Siri to access my phone watch and my ancient Mac at home.

Sounds like a lot… kinda complicated? Well it kinda is!

My vision can change from hour to hour very dramatically… not in a good way.

So I may start my day using just larger fonts and the screen brightness all the way up.

I end my day needing to use voiceover unable to use the screen at all.

As an aside I use Siri voice assistant with voice feedback a lot!

I also have my phone set up to read the screen on command.

For more information on Apples accessibility for visually impaired check out this link.

So yes blind people can use phones, computers, (talking) cash machines and smart watches.

apple.news/AbswLIkqJQSG2x67z6bPiAA

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Upgraded: The Gaming Accessibility Conference 2018

Gaming accessibility is something I’m really passionate about because I have grown up gaming and with a visual impairment.

A lot is being done it has to be said mostly by Microsoft (the Xbox one has a screen reader, Magnification and a plethora of controller set up options) it seems the whole gaming community is getting together to spread the word on accessible gaming.

I would have loved to have been at this conference able to get my voice heard.

I have a Nintendo Switch and I love it dearly but it lacks even basic accessibility settings when you compare it with the big boys of PlayStation and Xbox (however there is give and take on both sides)… purely based on accessibility I would love to own an Xbox as well as my Switch.

NEWSFLASH! People with all kinds of disabilities play console/computer games of all kinds. We are as diverse as any other group it’s time for industry to hear our voice.

Please see below for original post

Upgraded: The Gaming Accessibility Conference 2018

https://uncannyvivek.wordpress.com/2018/11/27/gaconf2018/
— Read on uncannyvivek.wordpress.com/2018/11/27/gaconf2018/

Spyro The Dragon Remake Excludes Deaf Gamers

Ok I’m going to wade in and out this point across on the flip side.

There are many games that ONLY have subtitles and no narration this thus excludes blind gamers.

There is no one size fits all to make gaming accessible to everyone.

I’m currently playing Let’s Go Pokémon and for me given it’s a RPG driven by text I’m really genuinely surprised there is not the option to change the text size or text contrast.

I think what we need to take away from this is that game developers need to do more and think more about the accessibility of the content they are creating.

Spyro The Dragon Remake Excludes Deaf Gamers

Spyro The Dragon Remake Excludes Deaf Gamers
— Read on samedifference1.com/2018/11/20/spyro-the-dragon-remake-excludes-deaf-gamers/

Bid to kill #CAPTCHA security test gains momentum

Bid to kill CAPTCHA security test gains momentum

This is great since CAPTCHA’s started popping up blind and visually impaired people have faced huge issues accessing anything online that needs a CAPTCHA. This has lead to people having to ask sighted people for help sometimes having to give out there log in details and other secure information.

Since they were initially launched there have been access improvements – many now have scrambled audio where numbers are spoken alongside what I can only describe as noise. Unfortunately this has not gone far enough the audio versions don’t work on mobile platforms and are often just as unintelligible as there written alternatives.

From the early days of the CAPTCHA there have been viable alternatives and quite frankly it’s about time code writers and designers start using them.

Wow Excitement at geekish levels!

Well I appreciate this post will bore most of you in to a stupor of non caring existence ant that your opinion of me will perhaps change to one that sees me as some who blows their own trumpet. This is a risk i am willing to take because I am proud of my achievements!

I should explain for the beginning – Way back as a teenager in secondary school I was started on a programme of touch typing using Mavis Beacon Teaches typing. I used this software once or twice a week to help me learn to touch type. At the time I hated it and sometimes sat at the computer on my own doing nothing except possibly eating the bar of chocolate I had stowed about my person, of course I quickly lurched into action if there was a teacher around! Some days the cheating was impossible and I kind of liked the idea of being able to type really fast without looking at the computer keyboard, plus my parents and teachers regularly told me how important the ability to type would be in my life – for all the skiving and the boredom I did take it seriously! Even back then I knew that my hand writing was incomparable to even my peers with the scruffiest writing, I often struggled to read my own hand writing and positively felt sorry for my teachers who had to read anything I had written in a hurry.

Progress was PAINFULLY slow but I stuck at it, my journey was helped greatly but the sudden emergence of (as it was back then) MSN Messenger, I guess this increased the amount of time I spent typing even if I was hunched over the computer keyboard looking at the large print yellow on black keyboard stickers!

Bare in mind at school and to an extent college I was expected to hand write during class, most homework assignments had to go into our exercise books at school, My typing was considered to be at to infant a level for me to be eligible to use a Laptop in classes, this is probably true it was probably not yet faster for me to type than it was to write but I perhaps feel for everyone’s sake it may have been easier for everyone to read if I had typed it. Eventually I must have been in year 9 or maybe even year 10 my typing was considered fast enough to warrant me being loaned a laptop, a whopping 37 words a minute (WPM) I belive. The first laptop I was given I eagerly carried home, turned on and it crashed, I got a blue screen of death and then it turned itself off. It was replaced a few days later by what can only be described as a BEAST of a laptop, it was incredibly heavy and brick like, the power pack was quite possibly the size of a standard house brick and equally as heavy.

So anyway back to the topic in hand since using a laptop more first at school, college and then full-time at university and for play my typing speed has improved greatly.

I got an incredibly sense of nostalgia when whilst wandering thought Apples new App store I came across Mavis Beckon teaches typing ’11 ultimate edition.

I was however disappointed to discover its impossible to make the practice fonts bigger in this new edition, meaning I made mistakes because  I could not read what I was supposed to be typing unless I hunched with my head very close to the screen which is not good posture for typing! As a result my average WPM scores were incredibly disappointing!

However there is a silver lining to the situation here. I discovered this evening that the Mavis Beacon software has a built in visual typing gauge that can be viewed whilst you type in any document or frame.

It has spent most of its time whilst i have been writing this sat around the 80 to 100 WPM mark, the scale only goes up to 100 WPM.

This is exciting! considering the adverse human being speaks at roughly 90 words a minute this is a very good thing.