A walk with Gus and me

I was bored and had to take Gus to the vet last week, the video is not interesting but has some interesting naturally occurring cinematic’s! Also as it was shot in the dark with no additional lighting I think it gives views an idea of what I can see… although I can probably see a bit les than how it came out!

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London’s Mascot’s

This week the organisers of the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics announced and unveiled the mascots for the games. They have proved to be VERY controversial as my friend Sam highlighted in his blog, as well as a lot of headlines tearing the mascots apart.

I am pleased that one of them has a link to disability and is remembering that the UK held the first ever Paralympics which is defiantly  something to be proud of.

In an effort to be accessible which I am quite appreciating the organisers have released the video showing the first part of the story of Wenlock and Mandeville with audio description, for those of you that don’t know what that is watch it and you will soon understand.

You Know You’re a Blind Person When…

Last week I read this article by Charlie Swinbourne Titled “You Know Your Deaf When…(Part 1).

This of course got me thinking of the you know your blind when hilarity this is something I have often discussed with blind mates and it stuck me that I have failed to post something like this before. Thanks Charlie for bringing it to my attention!

I must say all of these things you are about to read are true and have happened.

I would also like to add that if you have your own additions to the list you are about to read stick them in a comment with your name, URL and whatever and I will add them in!

Ok so after all that…

You know you’re a blind person when…

  • You accidentally wash your hair in factor 30 sun creme.
  • You don’t have a single pair of matching socks.
  • You hand your sister a container which you think is shampoo, your slightly less blind sister manages to see that it is in fact Hob Bright oven cleaner.
  • You go on holiday and accidentally come back with someone else’s Guide Dog.
  • You persuade a friend to play darts with you and hit your friend in the leg when it’s your turn.
  • The phrase ‘Blind Drunk’ has a totally different meaning to you.
  • You are totally unaware that the city you live in is completely consumed with fog… it always looks like that to you!
  • You HATE the idea of Shared streets!
  • You hate car drivers except when they are driving you somewhere.
  • Because you have some vision strangers refuse to accept that you are blind.
  • You get told off by the Police for walking into a bollard, they think you have had enough to drink already; ON YOUR WAY TO THE PUB!
  • Having a Guide Dog or cane means you never get ID’d in pubs.
  • You have full conversations with what you think is your friend, you later discover she’s not actually there.
  • Walking straight past the person you are supposed to be meeting is a regular occurrence even if it is someone you know well such as a parent.
  • Reading the cooking instructions on the food you purchase is totally impossible so you guess.
  • A person walks up to you says your name and starts a conversation you talk for a bit and they leave… You still have no idea who it was.
  • What colour are my trousers?’ is a perfectly reasonable question to ask a date.
  • You high-five the persons face instead of their hand.
  • Other people tell you to ‘watch out’ and then apologise and get all embarrassed.
  • You don’t care about 3D.
  • You stop traffic… With your cane/Guide Dog.
  • People you meet tell you all about their blind aunt flora (or other relative) and ask if you know her… After all, all you blindies know each other well.
  • The thought of you running scares your off duty Guide Dog so much that he proceeds to jump on you to make you stop.
  • You wear ear plugs to gigs… your ears are very valuable.
  • Walking along you hold on to your friend’s arm EVERYONE assumes you’re a couple.
  • Audio Description gets you VERY excited.
  • You forget that the friends you are meeting can see, you text them telling them exactly where you are sitting instructions on how to navigate to your position and what colour jumper you are wearing.
  • ‘How long is your cane?’ is a totally innocent question.
  • You spread Marmalade on your toast and take a big bite… Only to discover its actually mustard.
  • You walk into glass doors.

Blinder

Well readers as you may well be aware I have, simply for ease of understanding labeled myself as a blindie for some time. When you refer to yourself as a blinky most people of a certain age think you are talking about a cartoon koala bear not describing your visual impairment as partially sighted. So blindie has worked to convey that sense of hey I’m visually impaired it’s not a taboo subject and I am comfortable to talk and even joke about it.

I have been partially sighted since the day I was born, well I was actually born with very little sight at all but after some fantastic surgeons working there magic on my tiny peepers all I have ever known is partially sighted.

Growing up it has been drummed into me, quite rightly by various medical professionals, my parents, teachers and sometimes even friends that I have to be careful about a bang on the head. This is because if I sustain a serious blow to the head I am at a higher risk than your average human being of detaching a retina at the back of either eye or worst case scenario both!

I never expected anything more than this, I am a realist and I am grateful for what I have. I also never really expected anything less for most of my life I thought everything was going to stay stable and  be the same for ever. Oh how naive I was!

Last Monday I went for my appointment after I had the hemorrhage a few weeks ago. The very nice consultant, who incidentally reads my blog here (hello Mr N) confirmed that I have had a bleed and the general state of my eyes,  especially the right one is not good.

We decided together that I could now be registered blind, before that moment I was partially sighted the way I had always been growing up and suddenly I had the new label of a blind person.

The thing is the more I think about it the more I realise that it is just a label but this is very difficult to comprehend.

A tiny part of me is devastated which I think is only natural but in reality the change of terms means almost nothing. I have not changed as a person my life is not going to change much if at all with this new label but it feels very strange.

I guess to sum up everything quite simply its a blow and a shock but it could be worse and it’s not the end of the world.

Positives will come out of it,  I have the joy now as a person registered as blind to a half price TV license so one day when I have enough space and money to buy a TV I can look forward to paying less license fee!